City Council candidates Rod and Steed differ on goals for the city of Moscow

City Council candidates Rod and Steed differ on goals for the city of Moscow
MOSCOW, ID - On Tuesday night KLEW News introduced you to two of the four candidates running for Moscow's City Council.

Tonight, Palouse Reporter Rachel Dubrovin introduces us to the other candidates… incumbent Walter Steed and newcomer Rebecca Rod.

Moscow voters will elect three city council members in the upcoming election, and they have four candidates to chose from. Only one of them has experience serving on the council.

"I've got six years experience, I know how the city works," said Moscow City Council Member Walter Steed. "I know how the committees work. I know how the council works. I know what doesn't work, and what I'd like to try to see work."

And only one of them is a woman.

"I was looking at the council seats and I noticed that the one woman was going off the council, and I thought, 'Boy, we need some diversity here," said Moscow City Council Candidate Rebecca Rod. "We actually need representation.'"

Walter Steed and Rebecca Rod have both lived in Moscow for decades. But they bring very different experiences to the table… Steed works as a consultant.

"For 34 years, I've worked for cities and Indian tribes, and for water and sewer districts doing public works projects and low-income housing," said Steed.

And Rod is a small business owner.

"Citizen for thirty years here," said Rod. "I've worked at the university fifteen years. I have a lot of investment in the community. I'm a business owner, I'm a potter, an artist."

Their goals for the council also differ. Steed said one of his priorities is to make sure the city's commercial corridor beautification project is successful.

"We didn't think it's very attractive, we don't think that parents bringing students here to look at going to the U of I find anything attractive about it," said Steed. "We want to fix that."

Rod wants to focus more on the city's aging population.

"I think my interests run toward thinking about the retirement population in Moscow and how it's just going to be growing and growing and growing with all of us baby boomers," said Rod.

Steed and Rod are both running against Art Bettge and John Weber.
Moscow voters can select three candidates on their ballot, and only one of the four won't be elected to serve on Moscow's City Council.