Homeowners battle blaze from engulfing their homes south of Asotin

Homeowners battle blaze from engulfing their homes south of Asotin »Play Video
As the flames rapidly approached neighboring homes, residents began fighting the fire themselves.
ASOTIN, WA - Amid the damage of the fire, homeowners on Snake River Road are staying positive that the worst is over.

"I thought every house was going to burn down," said Snake River Road Resident Gordon Harris.

Gordon Harris is the hero who spotted the flames first spark up on the side of Snake River road.

"I started fighting it and it just spread too fast," said Harris. "By the time I could call for help or anything it was too late."

As the flames rapidly approached neighboring homes, residents began fighting the fire themselves, holding off the blaze until law enforcement and fire crews arrived.

"The police were a big help," said Harris. "They came and and started grabbing shovels and hoses and really helped out and kept my house from burning down."

"This has happened about every two years, but this is the first time it's been this close," said Snake River Road Homeowner Jerry Hendrickson.

"I was really concerned about my neighbors on both sides, as well as our house," said Snake River Road Resident Brenda Schultz.

Although the cause of the fire has not yet been identified, neighbors said that Red Bird Beach goers witnessed a spark ignite under a lawn mower that may have back fired just above the roadway in a nearby field. However, other's contend it was started by a cigarette.

"It was probably a cigarette or something because everybody was out working in their yards and we looked up and there was a wall of flames coming out of the gully," said Harris.

At this time, no reported homes have been touched by the fire and residents said they've only lost a few plants and trees along their property as they fought to put the flames out.

"We worked out until about one this morning, making sure that it wasn't going to come down the hill," said Hendrickson.

"All you can do is do the best you can do," said Schultz.

More than 1,200 acres of charred land, paint a black canvas across Weissenfels Ridge as crews continue to contain the fire.
The cost of the damage to the land is still unknown at this time.