ITD lengthy permit process keeps Omega Morgan megaloads at Port of Wilma

ITD lengthy permit process keeps Omega Morgan megaloads at Port of Wilma »Play Video
ITD considers Forest Service opinion of traveling thru Hwy-12 Scenic corridor.
LEWISTON, ID - The fate of two megaloads and whether they'll be permitted to travel through Idaho on Highway-12 remains in the hands of the Idaho Transportation Department.

KLEW news learns more about the processes of obtaining a permit, and how much longer the megaloads could remain at the Port of Wilma.

Two Omega Morgan megaloads are still sitting in the Port of Wilma following their arrival a little more than a week ago. In order for the company to move the over-sized loads, they're required by state law to obtain permits through the Idaho Transportation Department. According to Communications Specialist Mel Coulter, those megaloads could be sitting there for quite awhile.

"It can be a fairly lengthy process depending on the size of the loads and the routes they want to move over," said Coulter.

"We want to make sure that over-sized loads don't impact the existing structures such as overhead bridges," said Coulter.

The massive megaloads are 300,000-pounds each, that's about ten school buses combined.

"Many of the over-sized loads require a special traffic control plan, whether they will have a need to be accompanied by state police, whether they will have to have power lines raised and so forth," said Coulter.

Several different engineers from ITD must approve the formal request from the company to issue a permit. ITD also takes into consideration the United States Forest Service's opinion of the megaloads traveling through their land. U.S.National Forest Service Supervisor Rick Brazell wrote in a letter to ITD Chief Deputy Scott Stokes that they do not support megaloads traveling through the Highway-12 Scenic Bypass corridor. Whether or not that will play a large role in the permit approval is yet to be determined. Meanwhile the megaloads remain at the Port of Wilma under 24-hour supervision."

Omega Morgan Public Relations Representative Olga Haley said that the megaloads serve as an economic benefit for the area because of the money spent on gas, hotel stays for their employees, and rent at the Port of Wilma.