LPD train in realistic scenario to keep local children safe from shooters

LPD train in realistic scenario to keep local children safe from shooters »Play Video
Police train for emergency plan of action.
LEWISTON, ID - Local law enforcement are doing their part to prepare for what happened in Sandy Hook by taking part in an active school shooter training exercise Tuesday at Sacajawea Junior High School in Lewiston.

"You just never know where this is going to happen," said LPD Sergeant Jeff Klone.

Often times we are forced to make our minds think the unthinkable when it comes to violence within our schools. Whether it's the Columbine shootings, the mass killings at Virginia Tech and more recently, the Sandy Hook School shootings. Incidents like these are unavoidable, which is why the Lewiston police Department and other agencies train as if the unimaginable came true right here in our own community.

"Our officers need to know in their mind that they have been properly trained so they can go in and if we have an active shooter that they know how to deal with it," said Klone.

Alarms, gun noises, police tape and officers with firearms make this scenario as close to reality as possible.

"Any active shooter situation is a very dangerous dynamic and evolves very quickly it's very chaotic," said LPD Chief Steven Orr. "And as we learned, the first officers on scene have to make entry and have to engage the problem."

Police men and women are dressed in full tactical gear as they would be if this were a real life active shooter situation. The tight fitting gear allows officers to move freely as they scour the halls.

"Someone dies every 15 seconds once that active shooter starts," said Klone. "That's the national average, we can't wait minutes or hours for somebody else to respond."

"Columbine brought it to the forefront of everyone's attention, the need to evolve and change our tactics when responding to those types of situations," said Orr.

Police tactics continuously evolve as the criminals behind these crimes become more innovative. An emergency plan of action is one way to reduce the loss of life.

"We need to tell the students what to do, because what happens if the teacher is dead and now we have a room with 30 kids in here," said School Resource Officer Robert Massey.

"We're gonna go in and help them, and that's what we do," said Klone.

The Lewiston Police Department will begin their second round of active school shooter training Wednesday.