Permit to manage shoreline along creek in Asotin upsets some residents

Permit to manage shoreline along creek in Asotin upsets some residents »Play Video
George Creek.
ASOTIN, WA - The Asotin County Commissioners approved a permit Monday morning for the Conservation District to move forward with a shoreline management plan along George Creek.

The plan outlines a two phase project that would continue to reduce damage to the flood plain caused by high waters.

"The first phase consisting of woody debris control structures," said Asotin County Building Official and County Planner Karst Riggers. "I believe the point of this project is to keep the channel where it's supposed to be as well as protecting some private property."

Asotin County Resource Technician Megan Stewart said they're going to plant willow trees deep into the ground around the channel, to help reduce risk to the floodplain, while enhancing marine life and vegetation.

"We made a commitment to the landowner to go in and work with them the best we can," said Asotin County resource technician Megan Stewart. "We've been working with them for over a year so it's not just because of what happened last spring."

However some audience members were not pleased with the decision. Concerned citizens Jon Mallory and Carl Flynn voiced that the plan will be pointless because a flood will wash away any work that's done to the floodplain.

"You want to put a lot of planning and forethought into everything you do along these creeks especially because they flood, they always have and in the foreseeable future they always will," said concerned citizen Jon Mallory.

"Any work that they do will loosen up the rock and debris on the creek bed and deposit the rock on the neighboring land below," said concerned citizen Carl Flynn.

Others in the audience urged the commissioners not to approve the permit because they think it will destabilize the river and waste money. The Asotin County Commissioners approved the development permit after Stewart explained the project works to conserve natural resources along the stream channel.