Anderson's daughter speaks out against dismissal of Capone charges

Anderson's daughter speaks out against dismissal of Capone charges
CLARKSTON, WA - The decision to dismiss an attempted strangulation case against a Moscow man, considered to be a person of interest in the 2010 disappearance of Rachel Anderson, shocked the community on Monday.

Rachael Anderson has been missing since 2010, and many in the community have closely watched the case against her estranged husband, Charles Capone, that's related to a separate incident. The case has been one of the most talked about, watched and read cases within the region. Anderson's daughter Amber Griswold and her family have been caught up in the interest generated by all the media attention.

"It is a wave of emotion," said Griswold. "Sometimes it seems like it's been a real long time and we've been waiting for results and nothing's happening and other days it feels like it just happened yesterday."

With the latest bombshell that the State case will be dismissed to make way for new federal charges against Capone, Anderson's family is cautiously hopeful.

"We were hoping for this, so it's something we've been anticipating and I didn't think it would happen as soon as it is now," said Griswold.

Griswold's caution stems from the fact that if the federal government takes no action by May first, Capone will be set free.

"The worst situation that could happen is Charles Capone be released from jail," said Griswold.

Many who were present in the Asotin County courtroom for the shocking turn of events were caught by surprise when Asotin County Prosecutor Ben Nichols and Capone's Attorney Mark Monson made a motion to dismiss the charges.

"It's just weird to see someone that doesn't have any emotion towards it himself, but what's hardest about being in court is when they bring up statements, statement that my mom has said or statements that other people have said," said Griswold.

Rachael Anderson's family continues their search for her, even though the answers and anonymous tips they seek out may bring with them a truth that no one is ever truly prepared for.

"I think that I have faced it, like I say yes I hope that we find her body, but I don't think that in reality I actually can grasp what that means," said Griswold.

Griswold said that she hopes that justice is served and that the family finds some closure and peace.

"I hope for an ending," said Griswold. "I hope to have my mom's body and be able to put her to rest."