Palouse Habitat for Humanity celebrate building Albion house

Palouse Habitat for Humanity celebrate building Albion house »Play Video
Habitat house is a ‘hand-up’ helping Berrueta family build a future.
ALBION, WA - Palouse Habitat for Humanity partners with local churches, student groups, and other generous community members to help families become homeowners.

In fact, they just finished their thirteenth house. Reporter Rachel Dubrovin introduces us to the latest family that received a "hand-up" form the organization.

Every year, the Palouse Habitat for Humanity helps a hard-working family move into a place that they can call home. Their latest build was here in Albion.

"It's around 3,000 hours that people put into building this house," said Palouse Habitat for Humanity President Doug Arlt. "And they did it for tonight. Right? I mean this is what it's all about."

"Tonight, we're celebrating the end of the home build and the beginning of the Berrueta's life as homeowners," said Palouse Habitat for Humanity Executive Director Jennifer Wallace.

Palouse Habitat for Humanity chose Manny Berrueta, his wife Tonya and their four sons out of about 30 applicants for this home. It's based on their willingness to commit and financial need.

"Those are folks that don't qualify for a lot of federal assistance, but not enough that they could afford a home on their own in any realistic means," said Wallace.

The Berrueta's and a team of volunteers have worked on the house since August. Now they're committed to a 25-year-interest-free-mortgage that'll pay off the cost to build the home.

"It was a lot of work, it was a lot of work," said Tonya Berrueta. "All your free time is spent working on the house."

"That's right, and then you also have to deal with everything else, you know, your kids, school and all that other stuff you have going on," said Manny Berrueta. "So it's pretty intense, but in the end it's all worth it."

"It's so special to be able to give this gift, and give them the hand-up," said Palouse Habitat for Humanity Safety Officer Dave Ostrom.

Ostrom is one of the people that oversees the construction. He said these houses are a "hand-up" because they help families build a future.

"We've been living with our in-laws and it's just to have a safe place to raise your children is really important," said Tonya Berrueta.

"I think everybody wants to have that feeling, you know, of owning your own house," said Manny Berrueta.

Palouse Habitat for Humanity is always looking for volunteers, and their next build will be in Genesee. They'll start in June.

If you’re interested in volunteering with Palouse Habitat for Humanity, check out their website.