Valley residents views on Obama's Immigration Reform proposal

Valley residents views on Obama's Immigration Reform proposal
LEWISTON, ID - Our national leaders are working on a law that will address the approximately eleven-million people who are working and living illegally in the United States today.

Immigration reform is an emotional topic that gets people fired up on both ends of the political spectrum.

"They have just as much of a right to survive and feed their family as we do," said LCSC student Taylor Galusha.

"It's strictly political and it's only going to help Obama and the Democrats," said resident Virginia Farrell.

Galusha and Farrell are reacting to immigration proposals being offered by President Obama and also a group of eight senators. The so-called "gang of eight," comprised of four Republican and four Democratic senators, laid out a plan creating a pathway for illegal immigrants to gain citizenship, tighten border security, crack down on employers who hire illegal immigrants and streamline the immigration system, making it more efficient.

"There needs to be an avenue for them to become legal," said Galusha.

Senator Mark Rubio, a member of the "gang of eight" is pushing other members of the senate toward change.

"It makes no sense to invite people to come to the United States to study at our universities, to become the best and brightest in the world at the subject matter and then to ask them to leave," said Rubio.

But the change may not come easily. Bi-partisan thinking still faces its challenges at the national level.

"No one should expect the members of the Senate are just going to rubber stamp what a group has met and decided," said Alabama Republican Senator Jeff Session. "We are not going to just rubber stamp what the President of the United States has just decided."

The spirit of compromise also faces its challenges locally as well.

"I think they should have to stand in line, just like all the other immigrants did a long, long time ago," said Farrell.

With many details to be ironed out and decided, it's possible there could be a long road ahead for immigration reform.